Wednesday, June 29, 2022
Google search engine
HomeNationalWe need to prepare our soldiers for the transition of war back...

We need to prepare our soldiers for the transition of war back into civilian life

WE NEED FUNDS TO FIGHT MAINSTREAM MEDIA MISINFORMATION

We are 100% independently owned, free from corporate ownership and control. Help support a free press by donating to us.

Statistics released from the Australian Department of Defence show that over 8% of the
Australian Defence Force (ADF) have experienced Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in
the past 12 months; this is much higher than in the Australian community which is just over
5%. Therefore it is essential that all soldiers are monitored and treated quickly if they develop
PTSD, but is it enough to simply act after a soldier develops PTSD or should the ADF be
taking a more proactive approach and offering support to transition soldiers back into civilian
life after being involved in War.

There is no doubt that war is one of the most horrific things that any human can be a part of,
both for the soldiers as well as the civilians caught in an active warzone. Soldiers will see
things and do things that most of us will shudder at the thought of. We give our soldiers so
much training to prepare for conflict but do we train them to return home and transition back
into civilian life. One moment a soldier is fighting in an active war zone, with destruction,
injury and death all around them, then suddenly days later they are back in their lounge room
changing a dirty diaper. The transition between the two completely opposite realities is
extremely quick, so how can we expect our serviceman to simply leave behind the horrors
they have seen and been a part of.

Hector Garcia, a leading PTSD psychologist believes we need to train our soldiers to integrate
back into civilian life upon returning home from an active war situation, and if anyone should
be qualified to discuss it, then Garcia is the right man. Garcia is a Vietnam veteran who served
on three tours and got shot up in each of the three deployments. By 1971 he was medically
retired from the armed forces due to the amount of shrapnel in his body. Over the next 42
years Garcia suffered from depression, nightmares, extreme anxiety in public and self-imposed
isolation. His personal relationships suffered and as a result he saw himself married and
divorced three times and he battled an alcohol problem. All of this was due to suffering from
severe PTSD.

In the below video from TED you can watch Hector Garcia talk about his experience and
PTSD. Garcia goes on to discuss proven PTSD treatment and the need to proactively train our
soldiers to integrate back into society upon returning from war.

There is some positive news for the ADF with a new trial taking place called the RESTORE
Trial (Rapid Exposure Supporting Trauma Recovery). Serving members that have developed
PTSD during or after their military service may be able to participate in this new trial. The
treatment is a trauma focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) that is considered the best
treatment; Garcia discusses CBT treatment in his TED talk.

One would hope that this is the start of greater recognition of PTSD and better support and
treatment.

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -
Google search engine

Most Popular

Recent Comments

Ivan M. Paton on Approval Of Remdesivir
Beth on Free and Fair?
Novus Ordo Seclorum on Victorian Change to Mandates
Novus Ordo Seclorum on Health care in crisis
Novus Ordo Seclorum on Health care in crisis
Burnthehousedown on Postal vote outrage
Shanthini Balasuriyar on Queensland CHO – a law unto himself
Billie Hutton on Convoy to Canberra Two
Lynn a freedom warrior on Convoy to Canberra Two
Elizabeth on Ruble on the rise
Yvonne Ford on Pfizer drug recall
Gene Trevor Wyngaard on NZ Scrap vaccine mandates
Frances Mahy on Russia Sanctions The U.S.A
Peter Coxhead on My Story, So Far
Theodora Zajaz on Novak Out Of U.S. Open.
Leonie Young on Probuild Buy-Out
Shelley Madden on Pfizer, Stranger than Fiction
Debra Mullins on AVN vs Brendan Murphy
Malcolm on The End Game
Sabina on What’s Next?
Drew Duncan on Belarus Under Threat
Robyn on What’s Next?
Sofia Rutteman on Here We Go Again, Part 2
Robert Burns on Ricardo Bosi Public Address
Kim Henry on Pfizer Whistleblower
Lee Y on Give Me Five
Linda Nemeth on Ricardo Bosi Public Address
Warwick Hibble on Ricardo Bosi Public Address
Lesley on The Data Is Ours
Patricia Poppeliers on Here We Go Again, Part 2
Dani Stevens on Trouble in Paradise
Colin Stevens on VICTORY FOR THE PEOPLE
Leanne Robyn on VICTORY FOR THE PEOPLE
Dianedraytonbuckland on Facebook: Judge, Jury and Executioner
Michael Chere on Before You Inject Your Child
Kerry Taylor on Which one of us is blind?
Kathy Hirsch on First Nations Locked Down
Gloria Feather on Undermining The Indigenous.
Marie Millikin on Let us talk about intuition.
Lucienne Helm on Let us talk about intuition.
Susan Wilson on The real revolution
Jennifer Leonard on 2020 a year to forget
F J on Strange Times
Tracey Parsons on IBAC DAY 9
stacie rose on Which one of us is blind?
Uncertainty on My Story, So Far
Tracey on A Veteran’s Plea
Zaidee Lens Van Rijn on My Story, So Far
Alissandra Moon on The Rise of Medical Apartheid
Peggy Gothe on Mum, I don’t feel well
Keith Cashman on Mum, I don’t feel well
Melinda c Taylor on Mum, I don’t feel well
Vaughan Oke on Which one of us is blind?
Jane Ramsay on Choice vs Ultimatum
Brian K Wilson on Which one of us is blind?
Scott Dawson on Which one of us is blind?
Sandra Dee on ST KILDA STREET PICNIC